Course: Database Systems

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Course title Database Systems
Course code KMI/YDATA
Organizational form of instruction Lecture
Level of course Bachelor
Year of study not specified
Semester Winter
Number of ECTS credits 9
Language of instruction Czech
Status of course unspecified
Form of instruction Face-to-face
Work placements This is not an internship
Recommended optional programme components None
Lecturer(s)
  • Hronek Jiří, Ing.
  • Vychodil Vilém, doc. RNDr. Ph.D.
  • Krajča Petr, Mgr. Ph.D.
Course content
The practical part of the course includes an introduction to SQL (query) language, which is the seminars to manipulate a sample database (in Oracle 10 and MS SQL Server 2005 systems). The introduction to the theory of relational DBS includes mainly relational algebra, functional dependencies between records, normal forms and the basic principles of transactional processing. For Computer Science students, this part goes into more teoretical details, compred to the students of other fields. <ol> <li>Introduction to DBS. Notions, data and abstract models of data. DBS architecture. Models of DBS. </li> <li>Relational model of DBS and its characteristics, relational structure of data, the language of relational DBS. Introduction to SQL language. SQL, creation and filling of the table, queries (with conditions, column functions). </li> <li>Aggregation, nested queries, data manipulation. Referential integrity, integrity constraints, primary and secondary key. </li> <li>Joining tables. Foreign key. Table structure modification. Set operations, quantifiers. </li> <li>Analysis and design of relational DB. Conceptual modeling. ER model. Transformation to relational model. Complex queries construction. </li> <li>Further topics in relational DBS and SQL. Transitive closure of table. Views, triggers and indexes. Cooperation of SQL with other languages. The basics of administration of relational DBS. </li> <li>Transactional data processing. Basic principles of transactional processing. Data consistency violation prevention. Parallel processing of transactions, locking protocols, deadlock, two-phase commit protocol, timestamps. </li> <li>Theoretical basics of relational DBS. Table formalization, relational algebra, relational logic and calculi, query systems. </li> <li>Functional dependencies, Armstrong's axioms, closure, covering. </li> <li>Normal forms. First, second and third normal form. Boyce-Codd normal form. Normalization by decomposition of relation schemes. </li> </ol>

Learning activities and teaching methods
Lecture, Laboratory Work
  • Preparation for the Course Credit - 8 hours per semester
  • Preparation for the Exam - 20 hours per semester
Learning outcomes
The course of Database systems 1 consists of lectures and seminars and is intended for students of the third year of any bachelor-degree program. The course is an introduction to database systems (DBS), it covers both practical and theoretical basics of relational DBS. The practical part of the course includes an introduction to SQL (query) language, which is the seminars to manipulate a sample database (in Oracle 10 and MS SQL Server 2005 systems). The introduction to the theory of relational DBS includes mainly relational algebra, functional dependencies between records, normal forms and the basic principles of transactional processing. For Computer Science students, this part goes into more teoretical details, compred to the students of other fields. Basic knowledge of algebra, programming languages and first order predicate logic is assumed. Previous knowledge or experience with DBS are not assumed.
1. Knowledge Define and use relational data model and database systems.
Prerequisites
Basic knowledge of algebra, programming languages and first order predicate logic is assumed. Previous knowledge or experience with DBS are not assumed.

Assessment methods and criteria
Oral exam, Student performance

Credit: Practical verification of mastering SQL language in the environment of Oracle or MS SQL Server and designing aplication database structure. Exam: Oral examination of knowledge of the material covered in the course.
Recommended literature
  • Connolly T., Begg C. (2002). Database Systems. A Practical Approach to Design, Implementation and Management, 3rd edition. Addison Wesley.
  • Connolly Thomas, Begg Carolyn. (2002). Database Systems: A Practical Approach to Design, Implementation and Management. Addison Wesley.
  • Elmasri R., Navathe S. B. (2000). Fundamentals of Database Systems, 3rd edition. Addison Wesley.
  • Hronek J. (2008). Databázové systémy. Učební text. Katedra informatiky, UP.
  • Johnson J. L. (1997). Database Models, Languages, Design. Oxford Univesity Press.
  • Maier R. (1983). The Theory of Relational Databases. Computer Science Press.
  • Pokorný J. (1992). Databázové systémy a jejich použití v informačních systémech. Academia.
  • Rob. P., Coronel C. (2004). Database Systems. Design, Implementation & Management, 6th edition. Thomson Course Technology.
  • Simovici D. A., Tenney R. L. (1995). Relational Database Systems. Academic Press.


Study plans that include the course
Faculty Study plan (Version) Branch of study Category Recommended year of study Recommended semester